Local Man on Life Support, Facing Deportation, Enters Sanctuary

Local Man on Life Support, Facing Deportation, Enters Sanctuary

Mohamed Soumah, a 44-year-old man from the West African former French colony of Guinea-Conakry who has been threatened by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) with immediate deportation, has taken sanctuary in Ann Arbor Friends Meeting House (Quakers).  Mohamed, who has been living and working in the United States for fifteen years, suffers from a serious, life-threatening disease that requires ongoing medical attention. According to his physician, he is essentially on life support.  His home country lacks adequate facilities for this kind of care, so returning there would be a death sentence.  His mother, who suffered the same hereditary condition, died there due to inadequate treatment.  The average per capita income in Guinea is $825/year, and average life expectancy is 52 years. The United Nations Development Program ranks Guinea 175th of 189 countries included in the Human Development Index rankings.

Press Release – 31 October 2018

Press Advisory – 31 October 2018

How you can help:

  • Volunteer to provide support: A volunteer training will take place on Sunday, November 11 at 1pm at the Ann Arbor Friends Meeting, 1420 Hill Street.
  • Donate to  Washtenaw Congregational Sanctuary to Mohamed and build a sanctuary network for others facing unjust deportations
  • Advocate to the ICE Detroit Field Office to give Mohamed Soumah a stay of removal for medical reasons as the medical facilities in his home country are inadequate to provide him the lifesaving care he needs. Contact  [email protected]
  • Advocate for more humane immigration policies. One way to do that is to submit a public comment opposing President Trump’s proposed change to the Public Charge Rule, will make immigrant families afraid to access essential health, nutrition and shelter programs. Learn more at ProtectingImmigrantFamilies.org
ICPJ Statement on Immigration

ICPJ Statement on Immigration

Interfaith Council for Peace & Justice unequivocally stands with our immigrant sisters and
brothers throughout the United States and with our immigrant neighbors in Washtenaw County.
Our advocacy and our work with immigrants moves us to speak out and act for justice for our
neighbors:

There is a U.S. migration policy disaster, not a migration crisis. Contrary to the impression
created by xenophobic rhetoric, apprehensions of migrants at the southern border were down
44% in 2017, and net migration from Mexico has been negative since 2008 as more Mexicans
are leaving the United States than entering. The foreign-born population (documented and
undocumented) is about 13% in the United States, a smaller proportion than at the peak in 1890
and less than many other countries including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, and
Germany. Continue reading ICPJ Statement on Immigration

Area Faith Leaders Issue Forum Statement on Policing and Racial Justice

Area Faith Leaders Issue Forum Statement on Policing and Racial Justice

Over fifty Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti faith leaders issued a Statement on Policing and Racial Justice below. To sign up use the form at the right, or contact Rev. Jeff Harrold at [email protected], or 734-353-2527.

Statement on Policing and Racial Justice

“…What does the Lord require of you, but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?” Micah 6:8

As a county-wide, inter-faith advocacy effort with a faith-inspired platform that fosters mutual respect and effectiveness, we are compelled to mobilize and speak up for justice and equality. In particular, we believe that there is a great need for the leaders of faith to speak to the systemic racial injustice that is experienced by many in our communities. Our obligation is to speak up whenever anyone is treated unjustly for as Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King said: “An injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Continue reading Area Faith Leaders Issue Forum Statement on Policing and Racial Justice